Saturday, November 29, 2008

When You Turn into an Animal You Make Animal Noises Press

I knotted my hair into a snowball. I ripped a leg from the elk & used it as a crutch. The clanking sound was not its heart, which whistled in my sizzling platter. The pool bobbed with the thrown-out faces of men. Men & women pounded at the foggy window but the windows were locked so I turned up the Bach. My ribs are tuning forks, unaligned with any song.

Thanksgiving is over.

There, I said it.

***

I'm reading Everybody's Autonomy by Juliana Spahr. I'm on page 14 so I have a ways to go. What I would really appreciate is if you, in the comment box, let me know which theory or philosophy book was the most transformative for you. What has most deeply impacted your way of thinking/writing? I will then read it.

Whoever recommends the book that then impacts me the most will receive a prize greater than or equal to one pound of elk meat. Ok, greater.

Juliana Spahr looks like this:
I couldn't find a big cover of her book so her face will have to do.

33 comments:

Mike Young said...

The work of Emmanuel Levinas, specifically Totality and Infinity.

Gary L. McDowell said...

It might be a popular, or dare I say cliche, pick, but Gaston Bachelard's Poetics of Space was transformative for me.

Maximum Etc said...

Hmm, how to take this question? Most transformative lately? Provider of the most aggregated transformativ[ity] over time? Trigger of the single most concentrated moment of transformation in one's life, irrespective of said moment's duration and/or later reversal?

I think Zizek's _The Puppet and the Dwarf_ would be a very strong contender for me, at least in the aggregate category. I guess I read it in college. It's a great book in its own right, but what it really did was get me interested in exploring Christianity, which fundamentally shaped all my philosophical exploration from there forward and up through this day.

Mathias Svalina said...

The Giving Tree

Julia Cohen said...

My mom thinks The Giving Tree is sexist.


But thank you to everyone else. Keep throwing book titles at me.

Logan Ryan Smith said...

MONEYBALL

Chris Tonelli said...

Anything by Emerson...Self-Reliance, The Poet, whatever. But you've prolly already that shit.

NEG said...

Raoul Vaneigem's The Revolution of Everyday Life

jon pack said...

Henri Cartier Bresson and the Artless Art, but I didn't like the writing so much. Instead, I'd read what HCB said/wrote, compiled in The Mind's Eye.

Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind by Shunryu Suzuki was important. To me.

Oh, no. Forget all that. It's Remy Charlip's Fortunately.

Kitchen Press said...

Why Did I Ever, by Mary Robison. It's marketed as a novel, i guess because she calls herself a novelist, but one could certainly argue for it as a prose poem. or lyric novel. or some mixed genre something or other.

Janaka said...

Hmm, maybe a tie:

The Theatre And Its Double by Antonin Artuad

and/or

T.A.Z.: The Temporary Autonomous Zone by Hakim Bey

Matt said...

I haven't been transformed by anything, but can I still get some elk meat?

Donald Dunbar said...

Chuang Tsu: The Inner Chapters trans. A.C. Graham, though I've heard there are better translations.

elisabeth said...

Guy Debord's Society of the Spectacle and Walter Benjamin's Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.

ryan call said...

i liked fiction and the figures of life by gass

DOGZPLOT said...

the complete works of dr seuss.

DOGZPLOT said...

i should tell you though, that there is no complete works, you have to hunt them all down. its worth it though.

Brad Green said...

Elements of Refusal by John Zerzan really caused me to rethink many things.

christopher higgs said...

Deleuze & Guattari A Thousand Plateaus.

&/or

Jean Baudrillard The Illusion of the End.

Drew Kalbach said...

zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance by robert pirsig. i don't know, i really loved it, that and the tao te ching.

jereme said...

Anything by Osho. Specifically "Love".

Kitchen Press said...

and now for proper philosophy: anything by Kierkegaard

Maximum Etc said...

FEAR
AND
TREM-
BLING.

Julia Cohen said...

Well, it looks like I have my reading cut out for me.

Thank you. I should have just asked for this 2 years ago instead of going to MFA school.

I have sneakily been buying all the books I read (my only investment) or reading free review copies- so now I will officially have to get a library card, as I cannot afford to buy these at once or even on a payment plan.

O, but they shalt be read!

paula said...

the habit of being by flannery o'connor (her letters)
changed me

also other changes at other times-
pornography by andrea dworkin

r.d laing
the politics of experience

Elisa Gabbert said...

I second Benjamin's "Art in the Age..." also A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking (the first pop science book I found worth finishing).

Daniel Bailey said...

reading calvin and hobbes books as a kid was it for me.

Jordan said...

It's a tie: Shklovsky's Theory of Prose and Gadamer's Truth and Method.

Jordan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Meg said...

The Quran.

I highly doubt you'll read it.

Ay pues ni modo.

In your book alley however, I'd say that Ecce Homo is a great and short primer and whatever one needs to know about Neitzsche can be known from that.

The Tractatus of course is a winner. Don't be discouraged by the math.

Anything by Borges is an Ace in the Hole.

Dr. Suess...those who answer that really irk me. The pleasance of it all...ay caramba!

John B-R said...

I'm old, so there have been a lot. But right now: Alain Badiou, *Ethics*, and the first half of his essay "Is Love a Place of Sexuated Knowledge?" in *Contemporary French Feminism*, eds. Kelly Oliver and Lisa Walsh. Also, *Q*, by Luther Blissett. And maybe the infamous *Issue 1*.

Edmond Caldwell said...

Ernst Bloch, THE PRINCIPLE OF HOPE, definitely. And it's no relation to that weak Obama tea. Accept no substitutes.

Runner up: Martin Buber's I AND THOU.

Todd Colby said...

What? No Hegel? Okay then: Phenomenology of Mind. There, I said it.

Also: George Bataille's Guilty and Totality and Infinity by Emmanuel Levinas